Home Germinated, Lovingly Grown
From our Garden to Yours

Heirloom Tomatoes,
open-pollinated
Vegetables, Herbs & Greens

Pink, Purple, Black, Green, Yellow, Orange, Cherry, Currant, Bi-colored and Paste.

Eggplants, Hot Peppers, Sweet Peppers, Tomatillos

Lettuces, Kales, Chard, Cabbage, Herbs

 

Ground Cherrys, Sesame, Dyer Plants, Heirloom Cotton

About Us

Over twenty years ago, we started a seedling yard sale, and later joined the Great Brookland Yard Sale (#19 on the GBYS map). With the Covid interregnum, out of necessity, we built this website to continue that tradition with curbside pickup. We have since suspended online sales, but have maintained the website to share our expansive inventory (and possibly expand our online sales in the future). While there is no cart here for checkout, you can add your selected seedlings to a personal Shopping List, and then print it out or email it to yourself for our sale days (pdf available to account holders).

This year, we are NOT Selling Nor Shipping ONLINE.

FOR SPRING 2024, WE PLANNED and HELD 3 WEEKEND YARD SALES:

Thank you to all who attended on

Sat. April 20 , Sat. & Sun., May 4 & 5, Sat. & Sun., May 11 & 12

We are watching weather for one day per weekend sales May 18-19, and May 25-26.

We will soon post the dates and hours here, on the Brookland Listserv and FB group, and via email to account holders.

As urban gardeners and seedling producers in the Brookland neighborhood of NE Washington DC, we work toward biodiversity, and employ environmentally sound, sustainable practices. Many of our seedlings germinate from seeds saved or cuttings from our garden. Other seeds come from members of the Seed Savers Exchange catalog or store, the Dwarf Tomato Project, and a host of inspired independent growers, cooperatives, and businesses (see our Resources page).

Our garden is vibrant from years of building nutrient rich, microbiologically fertile soil. It is part of our “foodshed”, and it sequesters carbon. We look to principles of permaculture, regenerative agriculture, co-planting and balance to invite a rich array of pollinators, birds and diverse fauna into our urban yard and garden. We plant and amend only with sustainable and organic inputs while employing the principles of integrated pest management if needed.

The 2024 GBYS map is complete.  For our location, we are #19. We also post our location on the local Brookland Listserv and Brookland Facebook Group. If you wish to receive our occasional email updates, please register on the My Account page.

Thank you for your visit

We Grow Heirlooms

Greetings gardening friends —                                                                                                        9 April 2023

Happy Spring planning and planting of your gardens!

We spend winter months curating and procuring seeds. Beyond saving our own seeds, this year’s catalog comes from varying sources of heirloom and open-pollinated seed: each variety with a culinary, historical, and cultural story. We endeavor to share those stories on our website product pages and seed sources on our resources page.

In our 2024 catalog, we carry over most all varieties from 2023 and add 83 more. On this website, we badge new varieties “New 2024”, and for a quick look at new items, we have a “New 2024” tab on the store page.

Some highlights: We are growing more pepper, herb, and several new okra varieties and artichoke, alpine strawberries, and passionfruit vine. We now have 3 Rhubarb varieties (2  additions). A neighbor planted our Victoria variety last spring, and has two robust plants now ready for harvest.

This year’s sale dates, times and offerings are listed above in “About US“.

Please remember that the nightshade family members — tomatoes, eggplants, and peppers — are of tropical origin. Planting too early in the season or without protection can irreparably harm nightshades when temperatures dip under 50 degrees (particularly true for tomatoes). Nightshades thrive in warm/hot weather and grow quickly once planted in the right conditions and can produce until the first fall frost. Historically, in our area, this means planting in early May around Mother’s Day when night-time temperatures are consistently above 50 degrees. The effects of climate change might eventually change this planting rule, but cold weather has consistently surprised us the week before our May sale.

Thanks for coming by.

Best regards,

Lori & Jim

Scroll to Top